Human immunodeficiency virus infection is associated with accelerated atherosclerosis.

Guaraldi G, Zona S, Orlando G, Carli F, Ligabue G, Fiocchi F, Menozzi M, Rossi R, Modena MG, Raggi P.

J Antimicrob Chemother. 2011 Aug;66(8):1857-60. doi: 10.1093/jac/dkr206. Epub 2011 Jun 8.

OBJECTIVES: Cardiovascular risk is increased in HIV-infected individuals compared with the general population, making HIV disease an ideal model to investigate the pathogenesis and natural history of atherosclerosis. In this pilot study, we compared the progression of coronary artery calcium (CAC) between HIV-infected and uninfected patients. METHODS: Atherosclerosis progression was assessed in 25 HIV-infected men and 13 HIV-negative controls by means of sequential CAC scans using CT. A CAC score progression >/= 15%/year was used as a surrogate marker of increased risk of cardiovascular events. RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 11 months, a CAC score increase >/= 15%/year was detected in 14 HIV-infected patients (56%) and 4 HIV-negative individuals (31%). HIV infection, age and hypercholesterolaemia were independently associated with a CAC score increase >/= 15%/year in an adjusted Cox regression model. CONCLUSIONS: HIV infection, age and hypercholesterolaemia were independently associated with CAC progression. HIV as well as traditional risk factors contribute to accelerate atherosclerosis in HIV-infected patients.

PMID: 21653601

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.