HIV-associated lymphoma.

Kaplan LD.

Best Pract Res Clin Haematol. 2012 Mar;25(1):101-17. doi: 10.1016/j.beha.2012.01.001. Epub 2012 Feb 22.

The incidence of aggressive lymphoma in the setting of HIV infection is significantly increased relative to the general population. Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) for HIV has reduced the incidence of these neoplasms and has significantly improved clinical outcome for those who do develop lymphoma and require chemotherapy. With the possible exception of those individuals with the most severe immunocompromise, patients with HIV-associated lymphoma can be treated with the same standard immuno-chemotherapy regimens used in the immunocompetent population with similar expectations for good clinical outcome. Infusional regimens like dose adjusted EPOCH-R appear to be highly effective first-line therapy and for relapsed patients high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support is well-tolerated and effective. However, it should be recognized that there are unique risks associated with management of lymphoma in this patient population. While opportunistic infections are no longer a significant cause of death, antiretroviral agents used for management of HIV infection may interact with chemotherapeutic agents and other adjunctive therapies making communication between the treating Oncologist and the patient's primary HIV treatment provider of prime importance.

PMID: 22409827

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.