Effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition in HIV-associated nephropathy.

Burns GC, Paul SK, Toth IR, Sivak SL.

J Am Soc Nephrol. 1997 Jul;8(7):1140-6. doi: 10.1681/ASN.V871140.

Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition (ACEI) delays progression of diabetic and nondiabetic renal disease. This study examined the effect of fosinopril, 10 mg by mouth daily, in HIV-associated nephropathy (HIV-AN). Twenty patients with HIV-AN were studied. Of 11 patients with non-nephrotic-range proteinuria, 7 received treatment and 4 did not. Average baseline creatinine (mg/dl) for treated and nontreated patients was 1.3 +/- 0.24 and 1.0 +/- 0.25, respectively (P = 0.07). At 24 wk, creatinine of treated and nontreated patients was 1.5 +/- 0.34 and 4.9 +/- 2.4 (P = 0.006). Average baseline 24-h urine protein excretion (g/d) for treated and nontreated patients was 1.6 +/- 0.68 and 0.78 +/- 0.39, respectively (P = 0.02). At 24 wk, 24-h protein excretion of treated and non-treated patients was 1.25 +/- 0.86 and 8.5 +/- 1.4 (P = 0.006). Of nine patients with nephrotic-range proteinuria, five were treated and four were not. Average baseline creatinine for treated and nontreated patients was 1.7 +/- 0.46 and 1.9 +/- 0.42, respectively (P = 0.4). At 12 wk, creatinine for treated and nontreated patients was 2.0 +/- 1.0 and 9.2 +/- 2.0 (P = 0.02). The baseline 24-h protein excretion for treated and nontreated patients was 5.4 +/- 1.6 and 5.2 +/- 0.97 (P = 0.9). At 12 wk, 24-h protein excretion for treated and nontreated was 2.8 +/- 1.0 and 10.5 +/- 3.5 (P = 0.008). These preliminary data suggest that treatment with ACEI may stabilize serum creatinine and 24-h protein excretion for up to 24 wk in patients with non-nephrotic-range proteinuria and for up to 12 wk in patients with nephrotic-range proteinuria when initial serum creatinine is < or = 2.0 mg/dl. Furthermore, the renin-angiotensin system may play a role in HIV-AN, and early treatment with ACEI may be beneficial in HIV-AN.

PMID: 9219164

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.