Factors affecting African-American participation in AIDS research.

Sengupta S, Strauss RP, DeVellis R, Quinn SC, DeVellis B, Ware WB.

J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2000 Jul 1;24(3):275-84. doi: 10.1097/00126334-200007010-00014.

BACKGROUND: Although African Americans are disproportionately affected by the AIDS epidemic, they are underrepresented in AIDS research, particularly in AIDS clinical trials. This study examines a multidimensional construct of distrust and other factors that may affect willingness to participate in AIDS research. METHODS: A total of 301 African Americans (aged >/=18 years) in Durham, North Carolina participated in a cross-sectional survey. In-person interviews, 20 to 25 minutes in length, were conducted with participants. Structural equation modeling was used to develop models exploring distrust and other factors affecting willingness to participate in AIDS research among African Americans. RESULTS: Distrust was the strongest inverse predictor of willingness to participate in AIDS clinical trials. Distrust was not significantly associated with willingness to participate in AIDS surveys and educational interventions. Altruism, facilitators/barriers, religiosity, and economic group membership were also significantly associated with willingness to participate in AIDS clinical trials. Only altruism was significantly associated with willingness to participate in AIDS surveys and educational interventions. CONCLUSIONS: Distrust about research institutions is a significant barrier to recruiting African Americans in AIDS clinical trials. Issues of distrust need to be acknowledged by researchers to develop better recruitment and retention strategies when conducting AIDS clinical trials in African-American communities.

PMID: 10969353

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.