Single nucleotide polymorphism upstream of interleukin 28B associated with phase 1 and phase 2 of early viral kinetics in patients infected with HCV genotype 1.

Howell CD, Gorden A, Ryan KA, Thompson AJ, Ibrahim C, Fried M, Afdhal NH, McHutchison JG, Shianna KV, Goldstein DB, Shuldiner AR, Mitchell BD.

J Hepatol. 2012 Mar;56(3):557-63. doi: 10.1016/j.jhep.2011.10.004. Epub 2011 Oct 23.

BACKGROUND & AIMS: We studied the relationship between IL28B gene-related SNP rs12979860 and early viral kinetics (day 0-28) during peginterferon and ribavirin treatment, in 173 African Americans (AA) and 188 Caucasian Americans (CA) with HCV genotype 1. METHODS: We studied the relationship between IL28B 16 gene-related SNP rs12979860 and early viral kinetics (day 0-28) 17 during peginterferon and ribavirin treatment, in 171 African 18 Americans (AA) and 188 Caucasian Americans (CA) with HCV 19 genotype 1. RESULTS: Compared to non-C/C genotypes, C/C was associated with greater declines in serum HCV RNA during phase 1 (day 0-2), phase 2 (day 7-28), and day 0-28 and higher response (undetected HCV RNA) rates at weeks 4 and 12 in AA and CA. A static phase and increases in HCV RNA from day 2 to 7 were more common in patients with non-C/C genotypes. C/C was also associated with higher week 24, 48, and 72 response rates in CA (p<0.01) but not in AA. At baseline, SNP genotype was the only independent predictor of phase 1; SNP genotype and phase 1 were independent predictors of phase 2 (p<0.001). There were no racial differences in HCV RNA declines during phase 1, day 2-7, phase 2, and day 0-28 with the same SNP genotype. AA with C/C and C/T genotypes had lower week 24, 48, and 72 (SVR) rates than did CA (p=0.03). SNP C/C predicted higher SVR rates in AA and CA with high baseline HCV RNA (>/= 600,000 IU/ml), and in CA with >/= 1 log(10)IU/ml decrease in HCV RNA from day 0 to 28. CONCLUSIONS: SNP rs12979860 is strongly associated with both phase 1 and phase 2 HCV RNA kinetics in AA and CA with HCV genotype 1.

PMID: 22027585

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.